Yoga blog

Yoga for Pelvic Girdle Pain (PGP)

As many as 1 in 5 women experience Pelvic Girdle Pain (PGP) during pregnancy and for some this continues after birth. I’m not a medical professional and if you are living with PGP please ensure you see your GP before undertaking any new exercise regime. However, as a Yoga Teacher and pre-and-post natal exercise specialist I have been trained in how to adapt and suggest exercises which may reduce this pain by strengthening and stretching muscles which support the pelvic girdle. If any of them don’t work for you or aggravate pain stop immediately.

Initial Relaxation

Kneel down (if comfortable or sit as comfortably as possible)

Take some deep breaths, notice the parts of your body in contact with the floor. Scan your body for any other sensations. Focus your breathing, noticing the air passing in and out through the nose. Take some time here and then slowly come back into your body, blink open the eyes.

 

Gentle warm up

Roll your shoulders, reach your arms high, maybe lean side to side.

Come to all fours

Cat stretch

  • Wrists under shoulders
  • Knees under hips (any discomfort in the knees put a blanket under them)
  • Engage the outer side of your upper arms (triceps) and don’t lock out your elbow joints
  • Engage your core muscles and your pelvic floor
  • Round your back, push into the hands to draw the shoulders apart at the back and tilt your pelvis forwards
  • Keep the abdominal muscles working and stay here for a few breaths.
  • Repeat 3 times

B image cat (2).jpg

Kneeling Core and Hip Exercises

  • Come to kneel with wrists under shoulders, knees under hips (like in cat stretch you can put a blanket under the knees if you want to)
  • It’s really important for this exercise that you keep your hips level with one another, opening the hip to the side could aggravate your pain.
  • Lift your right leg behind, then bracing your abdominal muscles lift your left arm, balance here and breath.
  • Change to the other side
  • Repeat on each side 3 times
  • This exercise is suitable for pregnant women, but if you experience any reflux stop and rest, try it when you’re feeling better.

B image Birddog (2)

Low Lunge

  • This one again it’s really important to keep the hips aligned. If you have hypermobility or are pregnant be especially careful.
  • From kneeling step the right foot in between the hands
  • Push into your right foot and sink your hips forward just to the point where you feel a nice gentle stretch. As GPG can sometimes result in tight hips and thigh pain this will hopefully relieve this.
  • Hold for about a minute and change to the other side

 

Low-lunge-SS.jpg

Stand up carefully – when getting up and down keep your pelvis level, move slowly

 

Roll Downs

  • Stand tall and strong leg muscles active, knees not locked out
  • Tuck chin to chest and slowly start to roll down folding towards the floor
  • Keep the abdominal muscles engaged and active throughout
  • Once you’ve slowly rolled down, carefully and slowly keeping the core active roll back up
  • Repeat about 5 times

 

Lying Core Exercises (not suitable for pregnant women after the first trimester)

  • Lie flat on your back
  • Bring your knees up towards the ceiling.
  • Reach your fingers towards the ceiling.
  • Take your right hand and left foot towards the mat (but don’t touch it) and bring them back up. Then take your left hand and right foot towards the mat and back up.
  • Keep your pelvis level throughout, don’t lift or twist it
  • Keep your back flat on the mat (if it arches, don’t take the limbs so low)
  • Repeat 8 times, rest and repeat twice more

Afterwards try to take a couple of minutes to just breathe lying comfortably and making sure you are warm, perhaps with a blanket. Meditation can be really helpful in pain management so it’s really worth trying to add a bit of this to your daily routine.

 

General Tips for Everyday Movement

  • Try taking small steps with the hips aligned
  • It can feel more comfortable to sleep with a small pillow or blanket between your knees lying on your side
  • When going up stairs, engage your core lift your knee high without tilting your pelvis
  • Take your time getting up and down
Yoga blog

Yoga, Anxiety and World Mental Health Day 2019

I want this to be both personal, because mental health is personal and practical, by sharing some exercises and habits I use to manage and maintain my mental well-being. In no way should Yoga or the exercises suggested be seen as a replacement for proper medical care and treatment.

I have suffered with anxiety. Two years ago, I was in a job where I was badly bullied and I really unravelled. I think I had probably been living with mild anxiety for a long time, but it was at this point that it really took over my life. My husband, who had married me just a few months before, gave me more support than I could have ever imagined and I will always be grateful to him for that. I would cry a lot and often in public, the stress of being away from my house was just too much for me at that time. My head was like a hostile environment, I tortured myself by reliving minutia and doubting myself constantly.

I found the physical symptoms of anxiety some of the hardest to cope with. I would feel nauseous most of the time. I threw up a lot. I felt tight in my whole body and my head often ached. I think that I would have benefited from medication, but I was living abroad and I was earning only enough to cover my rent and my living cost so I couldn’t afford a GP appointment.

Yoga practitioners often talk about choosing your feelings and reactions to things. I do believe this, but I think it needs further clarification. At my deepest, darkest period I was practicing mindfulness. I enjoyed the beauty of flowers and trees I passed by and savoured moments of fun and love I shared with family and friends. I was deeply grateful for all that was good in my life, but I was still very sick and the situation I was living in was contributing to that so I had to change it.

If people are abusive towards you do not allow them to continue to abuse you and expect yourself to just be happy regardless. It can be very scary to make big changes and it can feel like the end of the world – but it isn’t. I quit my job, I moved back to England. I stopped working for a time to recover. I lent on my family in a big way.

I’d always been interested in Yoga. I first tried it when I was twenty-one following along with a DVD in my university house and I loved it immediately. I started to practice more when my husband (then boyfriend) and I moved to the French Alps for a summer season. I started going regularly after that to gyms and local community classes. It was when I was really ill that my Yoga practice became so much more than an exercise to me. When I was living abroad there was a really inspirational teacher at the gym I went to and I ended up going to multiple classes a week.

When I came back to England, I began my Yoga Teacher Training with YMCA Fit & Yoga Professionals. Part of the training involved keeping a detailed Yoga journal. As I slowly began to live by the philosophy underpinning Yoga, really thinking about how I could bring the Yamas and Niyamas into my life I also began to recover from my anxiety…

Can you ever fully recover from anxiety? Probably not. Therapy can help. Lifestyle changes can help. I now feel pretty good most of the time and I have ways of coping when I don’t feel good.

Part of the trouble when moving away from being anxious all the time is that feeling anxious is a normal human state to be in sometimes. However, whereas when someone feels anxious they might think ‘I’m worried about something’ I often think ‘OMG my anxiety is coming back, what if I end up feeling sick all the time, unable to leave the house and crying all the time again?’ So my response to feeling anxious can make me more anxious and that is something I’ve had to work on a lot.

I have learned it’s ok not to feel good all the time and I discovered that in Yoga. In Yoga sometimes moves or transitions are hard, sometimes you’re not the ‘best’ at that pose, one day you might be more flexible and the next day really stiff… But it is still Yoga and it is fine for that to be the case.

Also, there is something in us which craves the known and remaining in our comfort zone. If you’re really used to feeling anxious even though anxiety does not feel good you can default to feeling anxious because you feel oddly at home in that state. It’s a good thing not to be comfortable, especially if you are resting in places of comfort which are not benefiting you. I learned this in Yoga as well. When you start trying to balance on one foot or on your hands you really push outside your comfort zone, but it’s amazing and fun and you often fall over and find out that falling over isn’t that bad after all (I am still not very good at most balancing poses, but getting used to trying has made a huge difference).

There’s one more thing that Yoga has helped me with when it comes to managing my mental health. When I was very anxious, I was completely and utterly obsessed with myself. I wasn’t a selfish person; I was a sick person. Have you ever burned your finger cooking? In that moment all attention is directed to the pain and the injury. It’s the same when you are feeling mental pain. But I have found that as I started to feel better turning my attention outward and focusing mainly on uplifting other people made my life easier. This is not to suggest that you should hide from pain, but you are allowed to not obsess and ruminate on things which aren’t helping you.

Now to be practical. Some Yoga exercises which can help maintain and manage (not cure or treat, you need a medical professional for that) mental health:

Calming Breath

Sit comfortably. Maybe close your eyes or let the lids feel heavy. Inhale and exhale evenly and fully. Try to take the breath down into the belly on inhale. Slowly start to notice and extend your exhale. Try to make it roughly twice as long as your inhale. If it feels good to count your breath you could inhale for four and exhale for six-eight.

 

Tree Pose (Vrksasana) with Breathing Branches

Stand tall. Root your feet into the floor. Find a focus point (drishti) for your gaze. Place your left foot either toes to the floor heal against the right ankle, sole of the foot against the side of the right calf or sole of the foot up against the right inner thigh. Find your balance. Inhale your arms overhead, exhale your arms down by the sides. Breathe fully and deeply moving your arms with your breath. Repeat on the other side. If you wobble or fall over laugh. Shake it off and reset your position.

 

Checking In Meditation

Checking in’ Meditation

 

Recipes

Wild Rice Salad

I don’t normally like rice that much, it’s always been one of those things I just can’t cook right and it goes gloopy… but this I love it’s really crunchy, fresh & zesty with lime. Also, although the rice took 45 mins to cook, the actual work is SO minimal.

Ingredients:

125g Wild Rice

1/2 pointed red pepper

1 red onion (homegrown if available)

1/2 apple (from the neighbour’s garden if in season!)

1/2 tin of unsweetened sweetcorn

1/2 tin of black eyed beans

2 limes

1/2 garlic clove

50g pumpkin seeds

1 chilli

A handful of mint

A teaspoon of White Wine Vinegar

Salt & pepper

Method:

  1. Simmer the rice for 30-40 minutes.
  2. Finely chop the red onion and dice the red pepper and the apple.
  3. Drain the sweetcorn and black-eyed beans and mix them in with red onion, apple and pepper.
  4. Squeeze the limes over the veg mix.
  5. Chop & add the chilli
  6. Crush the garlic and add to the mixture
  7. Finely chop and mix through the mint.
  8. Mix in the pumpkin seeds.
  9. Add the white wine vinegar.
  10. When the rice is cooked and drained, allow it to cool and add it to the veg.
  11. Season to taste with salt & paper.
  12. Maybe enjoy with a spicy homemade guacamole… because delicious & still vegan.
Yoga blog

7 Tips for Setting up a Daily Meditation Practice

Set aside a time to meditate

Meditation is great in the morning, although equally it can help people get off to sleep. Personally, I like to meditate in the afternoon to avoid the slump and feel rejuvenated. We’re all busy and we have commitments to family, work, friends etc. etc. so choose a time that works for you and stick with it.

 

Make a place where you feel safe and will be undisturbed

We can’t all build yurts in the garden, but if you have a busy house go into your bedroom and shut the door. Be comfortable. You could use a cushion or stack of blankets to sit on, or lie down on the floor or the bed. Make your own little ritual around getting comfortable, it will trigger your mind to relax and make the meditation easier over time.

 

Ensure that you are comfortable (at least at first)

At first it can feel like your mind and body are fighting against the meditation. As soon as you close your eyes your nose itches or you start thinking about what to cook for dinner. That’s normal, don’t beat yourself up about it. But learning to sit with a moderate amount of discomfort is really valuable. In life we can’t always be comfortable, sometimes our muscles might ache from being used, or our joints might ache from wear and tear. Coping with small amounts of pain and discomfort is part of life. And the same goes for mental pain, we can’t be happy all the time and things will sometimes not go the way we want them to. When you get started with meditation sit or lie down and be comfortable, but then start to challenge yourself – try sitting crossed legged without moving. If you feel an itch don’t immediately scratch it, if there’s some slight noise in the background don’t flick your eyes open. Sit with those feelings telling you to stop and move beyond them.

 

 

Use resources to help you

Well you’ve read this far into the guide so that’s a great start using resources!! And this is really the tip of the iceberg, there are loads of books and websites with advice (please see the resources section of the guide). Different strategies work for different people so hunt around and find what works for you.

 

Connect with others trying to add this into their lifestyle

I’d love to hear how your meditation journey is progressing and for us all to bond and connect, working towards being happier, healthier individuals. So why not join my Facebook group and keep in touch. You can also use the #hollysbreathingspacemeditation on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter. And why not start a little meditation circle with your family or friends?

 

Don’t be too hard on yourself if you miss a day

We’re human and we’re busy. Adding meditation to your life shouldn’t be a chore like taking the bins out. If you missed your time one day because any number of things intervened (or even just because that day you really did not feel like you could be present in that moment and it just didn’t happen for you) that’s ok. Don’t be too hard on yourself.

 

Do come back to it if you miss day

Don’t be hard on yourself, but do come back to it. Building a new habit takes time and effort, but it’s so worthwhile. Get in touch with others to help keep you motivated. Think about why you wanted to start this in the first place. And be thankful for whatever progress and positive change you’ve already seen in your life since starting.

 

Enjoy your meditation journey. If you have any questions or want to share you experiences with me, please do!